A Lower Body Mass Index is Associated with Cardiomyopathy in People with HIV Infection: Evidence from a Case Comparison Study (Report)

A Lower Body Mass Index is Associated with Cardiomyopathy in People with HIV Infection: Evidence from a Case Comparison Study (Report)

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is, with advancing immunosuppression, a risk factor for the development of heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. (1) In Africa, cross-sectional echocardiographic studies of HIV-infected individuals suggest a prevalence of cardiomyopathy varying from 9% in ambulant persons to 57% in hospitalised patients. (2) Patients with HIV infection and dilated cardiomyopathy have a much worse prognosis than HIV-positive individuals with normal cardiac function. The negative prognostic impact of cardiac dysfunction in people living with HIV is reflected by a median survival to AIDS-related death of 101 days in patients with cardiomyopathy compared with 472 days in patients with a normal heart by echocardiography at a similar stage of infection without antiretroviral treatment. (3) The cause of cardiomyopathy in black African patients infected with HIV remains largely unknown, although several predisposing factors have been identified. (1, 4) These include low socio-economic status, longer duration of HIV infection, lower CD4 cell count, higher viral load, low plasma selenium level, and advanced stage of HIV disease. (5) Malnutrition has been postulated to be a contributory factor in the development of cardiomyopathy in HIV-infected individuals, but to the best of our knowledge the association of nutritional status with HIV-associated cardiomyopathy has not been established in appropriately designed studies. (5)

A Lower Body Mass Index is Associated with Cardiomyopathy in People with HIV Infection: Evidence from a Case Comparison Study (Report)

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