Noninfectious Complications of Blood Transfusion (Report)

Noninfectious Complications of Blood Transfusion (Report)

As the risks of infectious disease transmission by transfusion were reduced through the introduction and progressive improvements in donor screening and infectious disease testing during the 1980s and 1990s, the residual risks of noninfectious complications of transfusion have become more apparent. Severe noninfectious complications, although uncommon, now account for most of the significant morbidity and mortality from blood transfusion in developed countries, as surveillance programs in Canada and the United Kingdom document. (1-3) To protect patients, emphasis has been directed at increasing awareness, recognition, and prevention of these noninfectious complications. Patients may still perceive that human immunodeficiency virus transmission is the most likely adverse outcome of transfusion, so it is practical to discuss the residual risk (which is less than 1 in 2 million) as part of informed consent. (3) However, noninfectious complications now far exceed the risk of human immunodeficiency virus or other infectious diseases by orders of magnitude; physicians have a responsibility to explain to the patient the relative risks of noninfectious transfusion hazards as well. In fact, if transfusion mortality is the patient’s primary concern, reactions such as transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and hemolysis from mistransfusion must be included in the informed consent disclosure of the current possible risks of receiving blood. OBJECTIVE AND DATA SOURCES

Noninfectious Complications of Blood Transfusion (Report)

Noninfectious Complications of Blood Transfusion (Report) | | 4.5