Commentary on Statement on Human Papillomavirus Test Utilization (Editorial)

Commentary on Statement on Human Papillomavirus Test Utilization (Editorial)

Michaela had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test at age 17, less than 3 months from her first intercourse. The test was interpreted as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) and the laboratory automatically “reflexed” this to human papillomavirus (HPV) testing. Michaela tested positive for high-risk (carcinogenic) HPV, had colposcopy and biopsy and cryotherapy for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, grade 1 (CIN 1). The result from her 4-month postcryo Pap test was ASC-US HPV positive. So what is the problem with Michaela’s story? Everything! According to national guidelines, (1) she should not have had her first Pap test until 3 years after her first intercourse or age 21 (1-4); (2) she should not have had HPV testing after the ASC-US interpretation of her Pap test unless she was at least 21 years old (3,4); and (3) as an adolescent, she should not have had colposcopy for a minor Pap test abnormality or cryotherapy to treat cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 1 (CIN 1). (3,4)

Commentary on Statement on Human Papillomavirus Test Utilization (Editorial)

Commentary on Statement on Human Papillomavirus Test Utilization (Editorial) | | 4.5