Evaluating the Role of Speech-Language Pathology with Patients with Communication Disability in the Acute Care Hospital Setting Using the ICF.

Evaluating the Role of Speech-Language Pathology with Patients with Communication Disability in the Acute Care Hospital Setting Using the ICF.

The practice of speech-language pathology in the acute care hospital setting has changed dramatically over the last 20 years. Speech-language pathologists now routinely assess and manage patients with dysphagia as well as patients with acquired communication disorders. In practice, clinicians have tended to direct their limited resources toward the assessment and management of patients with dysphagia before addressing the needs of patients with acquired communication disorders. This practice has resulted in a decline in speech-language pathology services for patients with communication disorders and has led some clinicians to question the role of the speech-language pathologist in the acute care hospital setting. This article continues this discussion by evaluating the role of the speech-language pathologist in the acute care hospital setting within the context of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF; WHO, 2001). It argues that by adopting the ICF, speech-language pathologists have a sound rationale for broadening their role to identify the communication needs of all hospital inpatients who experience communication difficulties in the acute care hospital setting. **********

Evaluating the Role of Speech-Language Pathology with Patients with Communication Disability in the Acute Care Hospital Setting Using the ICF.

Evaluating the Role of Speech-Language Pathology with Patients with Communication Disability in the Acute Care Hospital Setting Using the ICF. | | 4.5