Hutchinson’s Sign As a Marker of Ocular Involvement in Hiv-Positive Patients with Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus (Original Articles) (Report)

Hutchinson's Sign As a Marker of Ocular Involvement in Hiv-Positive Patients with Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus (Original Articles) (Report)

Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes two distinct viral syndromes. VZV infection is a common and usually benign childhood infection, manifesting as chickenpox. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) is a potentially devastating visual disease with variable presentation caused by the re-activation of a latent infection of the trigeminal ganglion by the VZV. The most common causes of re-activation of VZV are decreased cell-mediated immunity related to age, malignancies, chemo- or radiotherapy, HIV infection, and the use of immunosuppressive drugs.1 The characteristic vesicular cutaneous involvement in the area supplied by the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve with respect to the horizontal midline is usually the first clinical sign and is often preceded by pain in this area caused by viral replication in the ganglion.

Hutchinson's Sign As a Marker of Ocular Involvement in Hiv-Positive Patients with Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus (Original Articles) (Report)

Hutchinson’s Sign As a Marker of Ocular Involvement in Hiv-Positive Patients with Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus (Original Articles) (Report) | | 4.5