Interference of Asian, American, And Indian (Ashwagandha) Ginsengs in Serum Digoxin Measurements by a Fluorescence Polarization Immunoassay Can Be Minimized by Using a New Enzyme-Linked Chemiluminescent Immunosorbent Or Turbidimetric Assay (Clinical Report)

Interference of Asian, American, And Indian (Ashwagandha) Ginsengs in Serum Digoxin Measurements by a Fluorescence Polarization Immunoassay Can Be Minimized by Using a New Enzyme-Linked Chemiluminescent Immunosorbent Or Turbidimetric Assay (Clinical Report)

* Context.–Ginsengs are widely used by the general population. These herbs interfere with serum digoxin measurement using the fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Objective.–To assess potential interference of different ginsengs (Asian, American, and Indian, also known as Ashwagandha) in vitro and in vivo in a mouse model by using a new enzyme-linked chemiluminescent immunosorbent digoxin assay and an existing turbidimetric assay. Comparisons were made with the fluorescence polarization immunoassay.

Interference of Asian, American, And Indian (Ashwagandha) Ginsengs in Serum Digoxin Measurements by a Fluorescence Polarization Immunoassay Can Be Minimized by Using a New Enzyme-Linked Chemiluminescent Immunosorbent Or Turbidimetric Assay (Clinical Report)

Disclosure:"This posts contain affiliate links to Amazon.com. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases".
ebooksmd.com doesn't sell or deliver any of the products listed on our site. Instead, we list information about books that can be purchased from Amazon.com. We work hard to make sure that the information presented on our site is complete and accurate.
Interference of Asian, American, And Indian (Ashwagandha) Ginsengs in Serum Digoxin Measurements by a Fluorescence Polarization Immunoassay Can Be Minimized by Using a New Enzyme-Linked Chemiluminescent Immunosorbent Or Turbidimetric Assay (Clinical Report) | | 4.5