Molecular Alterations in Exocrine Neoplasms of the Pancreas (Report)

Molecular Alterations in Exocrine Neoplasms of the Pancreas (Report)

Pancreatic cancer is one of the leading causes of cancerrelated deaths in the Western world. Pancreatic neoplasms are broadly classified as exocrine neoplasms and endocrine neoplasms. Most pancreatic neoplasms are of exocrine type, which includes invasive ductal adenocarcinoma, intraductal neoplasms, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms, serous neoplasms, mucinous cystic neoplasms, and acinar cell neoplasms. (1) Infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common exocrine neoplasm associated with most pancreatic cancer-related deaths in the United States. Pancreatic cancer largely remains asymptomatic and is often diagnosed at an advanced stage when surgical intervention is not possible. This has prompted efforts to identify molecular markers that could potentially identify pancreatic cancers at an early stage. Currently available markers such as carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 lack the desired sensitivity and specificity because they are also overexpressed in inflammatory conditions such as chronic pancreatitis. Advances in molecular techniques have greatly facilitated our ability to study pancreatic cancers at the molecular level. High-throughput molecular studies to characterize various molecular alterations at genomic, epigenetic, tran scriptomic and proteomic levels have provided insights into mechanisms of cancer initiation and progression. This review provides an overview of various molecular alterations documented in precursor lesions and invasive cancer of the pancreas.

Molecular Alterations in Exocrine Neoplasms of the Pancreas (Report) | | 4.5