Mycoplasma Pneumoniae: An Emerging Pulmonary Pathogen (Commentary) (Clinical Report)

Mycoplasma Pneumoniae: An Emerging Pulmonary Pathogen (Commentary) (Clinical Report)

Mycoplasma Pneumoniae: An Emerging Pulmonary Pathogen (Commentary) (Clinical Report)

Mycoplasmas are unique forms of life that lack the ability to produce cell walls. Recognition of Mycoplasma as a bacterial pathogen took many years of intense clinical and research work. The first Mycoplasma to be isolated in culture was the bovine pleuropneumonia (now known as Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. Mycoides) was described initially by Nocard and Roux in 1898 No reports on Mycoplasma in humans appeared until 1942, when Eaton et al (2) described the isolation of a filterable agent recovered from the sputum of a patient with primary atypical pneumonia. This agent later named as Eaton agent, was believed to be a vires particle rather than a bacterium (3). The ability to pass through viral filters, as well as difficulty of growing this organism in cell-free culture conditions, supported its hypothesis to be a viral agent. However, isolation of the Eaton agent from cell-free cultures and its susceptibility to antibiotics led to the postulation by Mannion and Goodburn in 1961 that the Eaton agent was a pleuropneumonia like-organism and a not a virus (4). Chanock

Mycoplasma Pneumoniae: An Emerging Pulmonary Pathogen (Commentary) (Clinical Report)

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