Orotracheal Intubation in the NICU and Expressive Language Outcomes at 24-30 Months (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) (Report)

Orotracheal Intubation in the NICU and Expressive Language Outcomes at 24-30 Months (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) (Report)

Survivors of the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) have a higher prevalence of speech and language problems as compared to term babies; and those with prolonged respiratory support are most severely affected. The purpose of this study was (a) to investigate the relationship between the numbers of days of oral intubation and expressive language outcomes for premature infants and (b) to determine the best combination of predictors of expressive language outcomes for this population. An ambispective cohort study with 50 participants investigated the relationship between five variables of interest and expressive language at 24-30 months: birthweight, history of intraventricular hemorrhage, diagnosis of chronic lung disease, days on ventilator, and home on oxygen. Only days ventilated was found to be a significant predictor of expressive language outcomes. Results support a relationship between prolonged orotracheal intubation and speech outcomes. **********

Orotracheal Intubation in the NICU and Expressive Language Outcomes at 24-30 Months (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) (Report)

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