Right-Sided Infective Endocarditis Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in an Injecting Drug User: Outbreak Or Slow Epidemic? (Scientific Article) (Report)

Right-Sided Infective Endocarditis Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in an Injecting Drug User: Outbreak Or Slow Epidemic? (Scientific Article) (Report)

Introduction Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is a common etiology for infective endocarditis (IE) in both injectable drug users (IDUs) and non-injectable drug users. It may also occur as a healthcare associated infection (i.e., hemodialysis or line-associated). Worldwide regional variation has recently been described (1). Historically, MRSA has been specifically associated with IDU and IE in Detroit, Michigan although the majority of cases involving the right side of the heart were infected with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (2,3). Huntington, a metropolitan city in WV, appears to frequently receive illegal drugs via illicit trade based in Detroit (4,5). We report an unexpected case of MRSA IE in an IDU living in Huntington and question whether this was related to contact with IDU from Detroit or a reflection of a change in the epidemiology of MRSA.

Right-Sided Infective Endocarditis Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in an Injecting Drug User: Outbreak Or Slow Epidemic? (Scientific Article) (Report)

Right-Sided Infective Endocarditis Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in an Injecting Drug User: Outbreak Or Slow Epidemic? (Scientific Article) (Report) | | 4.5