The Nervous System in Antiquity (History of Medicine) (Report)

The Nervous System in Antiquity (History of Medicine) (Report)

This overview of the nervous system in antiquity shows that whereas neuro-anatomy had its heyday in the 4th and 3rd centuries BC (the Alexandrian School) and was later consolidated by Galen in the 2nd century AD, neurophysiology remained largely mired in erroneous concepts. While the descriptions of neurological disease often produced quite apt clinical pictures, poor understanding of pathophysiology resulted in ineffectual therapy. The embryonic origins of modern neurology lie in the gradual evolution of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology in antiquity. Closely allied to the early understanding of the nervous system was the contested issue of where the control centre of the body (hegemonikon) was located. These are the issues that we review. The body’s control centre

The Nervous System in Antiquity (History of Medicine) (Report)

The Nervous System in Antiquity (History of Medicine) (Report) | | 4.5