The South African Stress and Health (SASH) Study: 12-Month and Lifetime Prevalence of Common Mental Disorders (Original Articles) (Clinical Report)

The South African Stress and Health (SASH) Study: 12-Month and Lifetime Prevalence of Common Mental Disorders (Original Articles) (Clinical Report)

At the end of the apartheid era, the African National Congress (ANC) formulated a broad policy framework that forms the basis for the current enabling health care legislation in South Africa. The ANC government developed a health care delivery policy based on the district health system that was designed to extend the availability of appropriate health care. This policy placed most of the public mental health care within an integrated primary health care system. To achieve this primary health care goal, population-based data that identify the prevalence of mental health disorders, risk factors for these disorders, patterns of treatment, barriers to treatment, and the potential approaches to improving care are required. The South African Stress and Health (SASH) study is the first large population-based mental health epidemiological survey in South Africa. (1) It was carried out as part of the World Health Organization World Mental Health (WMH) Survey Initiative. (2,3) The SASH study is placed within the historical context of early post-apartheid South Africa, where communities are still sharply divided by racial/ethnic and national identities and socio-economic disparities. (4,5)

The South African Stress and Health (SASH) Study: 12-Month and Lifetime Prevalence of Common Mental Disorders (Original Articles) (Clinical Report)

The South African Stress and Health (SASH) Study: 12-Month and Lifetime Prevalence of Common Mental Disorders (Original Articles) (Clinical Report) | | 4.5