Vitamin D Deficiency in Breastfed Infants & the Need for Routine Vitamin D Supplementation (Commentary)

Vitamin D Deficiency in Breastfed Infants & the Need for Routine Vitamin D Supplementation (Commentary)

There has been increasing global interest regarding the role of vitamin D in health and disease. In fact, more and more scientific evidence linking vitamin D to various chronic diseases in children and adults is emerging. Prevention of vitamin D deficiency and achieving adequate intake of vitamin D and calcium throughout childhood may reduce the risk of osteoporosis as well as other long-latency disease processes that have been associated with vitamin D-deficiency states in adults (1-4). Despite food fortification policies in many countries and recommendations for vitamin D supplementation of at-risk groups, vitamin D deficiency and infantile rickets remain major public health challenges in many developed and developing countries. There is evidence that the current supplementation recommendations, particularly for pregnant and lactating women, are inadequate to ensure vitamin D sufficiency in these groups. Rickets attributable to vitamin D deficiency is known to be a condition that is preventable with adequate nutritional intake of vitamin D (5). Rickets is an example of extreme vitamin D deficiency, with a peak incidence between 3 and 18 months of age. A state of deficiency occurs months before rickets is obvious on physical examination, and the deficiency state may also present with hypocalcemic seizures (6), growth failure, lethargy, irritability, and a predisposition to respiratory infections during infancy (7). Two types of presentation of vitamin D deficiency have been described in children (8). The first was symptomatic hypocalcemia (including seizures) occurring during periods of rapid growth, with increased metabolic demands, long before any physical findings or radiologic evidence of vitamin D deficiency occurred. The second clinical presentation was that of a more chronic disease, with rickets and/or decreased bone mineralization and either normocalcemia or asymptomatic hypocalcemia.

Vitamin D Deficiency in Breastfed Infants & the Need for Routine Vitamin D Supplementation (Commentary)



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